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A Happy You Is A Healthy You! – Endorphins

Endorphins

A happy you is a healthy you

Your thoughts are the triggers for your behavior and thus the way you live your life. Being content with the life you're living have health benefits such as:

  • Lower levels of depression
  • Better coping skills
  • Less anxiety
  • Decreased stress levels
  • Better immune system
  • Reduced risk of heart disease
  • Increased life span, and more...

We can all learn how to renew and change our thoughts to better and more abundant life. A program I can earnestly recommend is Manifestation Miracle - Click here for more details on the program.

Don't forget to include things to boost your "feel-good" endorphins to be happier! More about endorphins...

Endorphins

Endorphins 

block pain,

lower stress levels and

support the immune system...

Endorphins also trigger a positive feeling in the body, similar to that of morphine. For example, the feeling that follows a run or workout is often described as "euphoric." That feeling, known as a "runner's high," can be accompanied by a positive and energizing outlook on life. - Logo for WebMD

Although endorphins have a similar effect as certain pain medications such as morphine, the activation by the body's endorphins of these receptors does not result in addiction or dependence.

7 Things to boost ENDORPHINS

Eating Your Favorite Foods

Eating your favorite food will increase endorphins. One should be careful not to increase eating speed leading to eating more than necessary. When endorphins (the body’s natural opiates which give a “high”) are low, it could lead to a desire for junk food.

Melinda Amato, of the Institute Of Optimum Nutrition, suggests endorphin-releasing foods making you feel happy - Here are some: Strawberries - Ice cream or frozen yogurt - Pasta - French bread - Bananas - Grapes - Oranges and Nuts.

Something Spicy

Include spicy food in your meal. Chili peppers, in particular, contain high levels of the substance capsaicin, which causes the burning sensation in spicy food. The chemical has been proven before to work as a topical painkiller for arthritis and also forces the brain to release endorphins, which in turn increases feelings of happiness.

Chocolate

N-acylethanolamine chemicals in chocolate stimulate the brain to release endorphins. As every chocoholic knows, a quick fix will produce euphoria and feelings of happiness. Chocolate also contains phenols and antioxidants which boost your mood. It increases blood sugar levels, but this can be followed by quickly by a slump.

 

Alcohol

Dr. Jennifer Mitchell of the University of California San Francisco said in a study: "This is something that we've speculated about for 30 years, based on animal studies, but haven't observed in humans until now. It provides the first direct evidence of how alcohol makes people feel good."

Be careful, though - Alcohol abuse leads to addiction...

Dancing

It doesn't matter what style of dance you choose -- from ballet to ballroom to country-western, they all work. Rather focus on creativity and enjoyment than negative or critical feelings.

"If you want to balance endorphin release with a maximized calorie burn, choose higher-intensity latin or jazz dance classes, which each burn about 422 calories per hour in the average 155-pound person; the same person burns roughly 317 calories while ballet and tap dancing, and 387 calories while fast ballroom dancing." - Lisa Bigelow in azcentral

 

Exercising

Exercise, especially team exercise, naturally raises endorphins and control neuropeptide Y which lowers anxiety and carbohydrate cravings and increases feelings of contentment.

After exercises, abnormal cortisol levels lower, dopamine, which is the arousal hormone, and norepinephrine lowers, which leads to appetite suppression and mood stability making you feel happy.

 

Sex

there doesn't appear to be evidence that too much sex (or exercise or laughter, for that matter) and elevated endorphin levels deplete the body of endorphins and then result in depression, etc. In fact, the most recent thinking is that exercise, as experienced during running as "runner's high," for example (and, likely, by extension, other activities that cause the release of endorphins, such as sex), can help treat depression — and health care providers often prescribe exercise! Indeed, a Duke University study released in 2000 showed that, for some people, 45 minutes of exercising, three-times-a-week, was as effective in lessening depression as was taking the antidepressant Zoloft.

Go Ask Alice - Columbia University